The Life and Work of Mathematician Michael Lacy

10:12 am on September 29, 2017

We need math on this planet for living and from solving the simplest problems that arise in the mundane day to day tasks such as buying that half a pound of blueberries from the Winn Dixie Grocery Store for great Aunt Gertrude to the complex numbers it may take a space station to calculate how far away that oncoming asteroid is from hitting Earth!

However as much as we need math, more so I believe we need the leaders, the thinkers, the believers and the teachers that teach it! You know those people. Those are the people with the education, desire, drive and the patience to delve into the numbers and claw at them, jab, root, and pluck until there is nothing left to the mathematical equations but ashes, dust, and a very clear answer and the rocky path it took to get to that answer.

Michael Thoreau Lacy is all of those things and more. He is a brilliant man and renowned mathematician. Michael’s work has been rooted in the laws of probability, ergodic theory and harmonic analysis. He got his PHD in 1987 so you can imagine how many years he has put into numbers of all shapes and sizes and how many students he has passed his knowledge of numbers on to. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=CVXnps0AAAAJ&hl=en and https://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/id.php?id=62509

When you think about it, those are people that could take his knowledge and use it to change the world in very simple ways we may not notice or in big ways like contributing to NASA! One of Michael Lacy’s biggest accomplishments was being awarded the Salem Prize for he and a fellow colleague studying the Hilbert Transform and solving the equation that had been formerly incomplete. Read more: Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

Michael and his mentor, Walter Phipp, who also helped him receive his PHD when he attended the University of Illinois, have also given proof of the central limit theorem. In his life, Michael has also received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship.

In 2012, he became a member of the American Mathematical Society, a group of professional mathematicians that devote their lives and work to numbers and solving the complex equations life and textbooks bring about on a daily basis. Today, Michael works diligently at the Georgia Institute of Technology where he continues sharing his knowledge with others teachers and students changing the world one day, one life, and one number at a time.